By Data-Smart City Solutions • May 17, 2019

LOS ANGELES TIMES: NEWSOM WANTS COMPANIES COLLECTING PERSONAL DATA TO SHARE THE WEALTH WITH CALIFORNIANS

As California grapples over a 2018 law that gives consumers control over what online personal data companies can collect and sell, Gov. Gavin Newsom and state lawmakers are attempting to put financial value on that information. Newson has pulled together a team of data scientists and legislators to create a system where businesses would make payments to the state or consumers if their data is sold. However, this article addresses how implementing that may not be so simple.

STATESCOOP: PHILADELPHIA’S DATA OFFICER WANTS TO INTEGRATE GIS INTO EVERYTHING

Hank Garie, Philadelphia’s new head of data and geospatial information operations, aims to improve the data of city agencies that is already available via the open data portal. The idea is to build on the city’s tabular data by adding geospatial information, such as neighborhood, property, or other geographic material, to make it more useful for users. For instance, tracking the specific location of city complaints can produce actionable data for city agencies.

GOVERNMENT TECHNOLOGY: DATA DRIVES DOWN NASHVILLE’S EMERGENCY RESPONSE TIMES

The Vanderbilt Initiative for Smart Cities Operation and Research, the Nashville Fire Department, and the Information Technology Services Department for the Metropolitan Government of Nashville and Davidson County have been working together on reducing emergency response times. The article contains a Q & A with university professors, graduate students and researchers, and industry professionals about the collaborative effort that became the Integrated Safety Incident Forecasting and Analysis project.

THE NEW YORK TIMES: SAN FRANCISCO BANS FACIAL RECOGNITION TECHNOLOGY

San Francisco became the first city in the United States to ban facial recognition technology this week in an 8-1 vote by the Board of Supervisors. The decisions stems from concerns of potential abuse by the police and other city organizations of the software, at a time when many city police departments are using facial recognition technology to search for criminals.

FEDSCOOP: THE U.S. MILITARY IS TRYING TO FIGURE OUT HOW TO TALK ABOUT DATA

With new technologies like 5G, artificial intelligence, and the Internet of Things, the U.S. military is in a position to become heavily reliant on data to improve mission outcomes. At the moment, the Department of Defense (DOD) isn’t utilizing the latest trends when it comes to managing data, but defense IT and cybersecurity officials hope that the Pentagon’s recent adoption of AI and cloud technology better equips the DOD to get on board with the latest data trends.

SMART CITIES DIVE: FEDERAL LAWMAKERS RE-INTRODUCE SMART CITY LEGISLATION

Lawmakers from both Chambers of Congress have joined together to reintroduce the Smart Cities and Communities Act—a bill that was introduced in 2017 but stalled in committee—to advance the progress of smart cities. While the federal government is already exploring legislation for individual elements of smart cities (i.e., autonomous vehicles, artificial intelligence, internet of things, and data privacy, among others), this bill has the potential to create better coordination and more cohesive oversight of smart city projects across the country.

STATESCOOP: SOCIAL NETWORK FOR ‘SMART CITIES’ ENCOURAGES IDEA-SHARING

A revamped website, The Atlas, now allows officials from different city governments across the country to talk to each other and exchange ideas on smart city projects. The website includes a social media network in addition to its project database, where city officials can post and share about their successes or lessons learned on projects, and also send messages to each other on specific topics. The Atlas’ new social components now facilitate the ability to discuss tools, strategy, and resources in depth.